Malaysia Airlines Flight 370: Remote Control Hijacking Technology is Public Knowledge for at Least 15 Years

The fact that Malaysia Airlines flight 370 was taken over remote-controlled by rogue U.S.-government / U.S. military elements continues to be dismissed by a growing number of people and media outlets – because a person would actually have to be on board to hijack any plane – even though that technology is proven to have been developed and therefore exists.

MARCH 17, 2014

Field McConnell’s (Abel Danger) Interview About Boeing’s Uninterruptible Autopilot System

It was announced in 2007 that by 2009 all commercial jets from Boeing would have this UAS installed, that’s already 5 years ago.

Again, that AWACS, even a remote-controlled version (AEW UAV), is perfectly capable of assisting in the remote-controlled takeover of any commercial jet by jamming radars and satellites is not a wild guess, its one of its standard applications. This is already known for many years, even by folks not affiliated with the military. It’s even been published numerous times in specialized publications. Even if you never read any of those you can still find this information in mainstream outlets online. The information is so common that it was already published for the public in at least 1986.

Herebelow is the chronology of the announcement of the BUAP: Boeing Uninterruptible Auto Pilot, which allows remote controlled take over of any commercial airplane equipped with this system. Boeing already confirmed in 2007 that all its jets were to be fitted with this system. Note that Airbus has a similar equipment on all its jets.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2001

“Bush Announces New Airline Security Measures:

…The president said new security measures would also dramatically increase the number of plainclothes federal marshals on airplanes, give $500 million to developing enhanced cockpit security and enable air traffic controllers to take over a distressed aircraft and land it by remote control.” – PBS

APRIL 1999

Airborne Early Warning Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

“Several strengths and weakness exist for the AEW UAV concept. The first strength involves cost. UAVs with only the “gather data” and “transmit data” elements (see Figure 2) would be relatively more inexpensive than the AWACS system—even though many would be needed since each would be relatively smaller/lighter and would probably lack the power needed to extend radar range as far as the traditional platform. Second, either Sub-concept 1 or 2 could 27 provide extended coverage by extending the AEW platforms’ orbit areas across the FEBA without placing an extremely expensive platform with a large crew in jeopardy. Third, with Sub-concept 2 (the hive principle), the sensor element of the high value asset becomes dispersed, which makes knocking out the “data gathering” function harder to achieve. On the other hand, there are weaknesses. The more capabilities added to the AEW UAV, the larger and more costly the platform becomes (Examples of additional capabilities are: ESM, remotely-controlled maintenance/optimization of mission systems, remote piloting capability, and extended range/endurance/altitude).” – AU/ACSC

DECEMBER 4, 2006

“Boeing Wins Patent on Uninterruptible Autopilot System

Boeing is, of course, not the first autopilot technology in existence, but this one has been designed with counterterrorism first and foremost in mind. Not only is it ‘uninterruptible’ — so that even a tortured pilot cannot turn it off — but it can be activated remotely via radio or satellite by government agencies.” – HSNW

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‘Missiles fired at’ Russian plane with 159 passengers onboard flying over Syria

 

Two missiles were reportedly fired at a Russian plane with at least 159 passengers on board that was flying over Syrian territory. Russian officials admit the jet faced danger, but are not talking of a targeted attack.

The news broke in on Monday as Interfax, citing “an informed source in Moscow,” reported that a Russian passenger plane was attacked.

Syrian [officials] informed us that on Monday morning, unidentified forces launched two ground-to-air missiles which exploded in the air very close to a civilian aircraft belonging to a Russian airline,” the source told the Russian agency.

The pilots reportedly managed to maneuver the plane in time however, “saving the lives of passengers.”

It is believed the aircraft was intentionally targeted, “but it remains unclear whether the attackers knew it was Russian or not,” the source added.

However, Russian officials, though admitting the plane might have been endangered, are not yet talking of a targeted attack.

The Russian Foreign Ministry’s said on its website the plane’s crew at 4.55 PM Moscow time (12.55 GMT) “detected battle action on the ground that, according to the crew, could constitute a threat to the 159 passengers on board the plane.”

The Russian Foreign Ministry is now “taking emergency measures to clarify all the circumstances of this situation, including making contact with the Syrian authorities,” the ministry’s spokesperson Aleksandr Lukashevich said.

The plane that was allegedly targeted belonged to Nordwind Airlines – a Russian charter air carrier – and was identified as an Airbus A320. On April 29 it was en route to the city of Kazan, in Russia’s republic of Tatarstan, from Egypt’s resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh.

So far, there are no grounds to claim that the aircraft became a target of a missile attack, experts say.

It was flying over a mountainous area in Syria when one of the pilots noticed “flashes on the ground.” After that, to keep safe, it was decided to increase the height of the flight, Irina Tyurina, a spokeswoman for Russian Union of Tourist Industry told RIA Novosti.

No one was injured, and the plane was not damaged. The aircraft landed in Kazan as had been planned,” the Russian Federal Agency for Tourism told news agencies. There were 159 passengers and eight crew members on-board the aircraft.

Meanwhile, Syrian aviation authorities received no indication of the alleged attack on the Russian plane, says the director of Syrian Airlines, Ghaida Abdullatif:

We contacted the service that monitors traffic within Syrian airspace. None of the air traffic control services or other ground services at the airports in Damascus and Latakia have confirmed the information of a Russian plane being fired at“.

Russian experts have already voiced their doubts that a passenger plane can actually perform the kind of maneuvers that would allow it to avoid a missile attack.

Planes are usually attacked either from the side or from above. A pilot could not have seen the missiles,” Vladimir Gerasimov, a Russian pilot and an expert on flight security told RT. “

A passenger plane crew simply couldn’t see what’s behind. And if something is approaching the plane from the opposite direction – the speed doubles, so there is no time to do anything, ” he added. Continue reading