Chavez opposes the International Interference on Syria

Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez, on Wednesday stressed that the Syrian people are victim of a violent colonial policy.

He asserted that he will assess the Iranian proposal on the inclusion of Venezuela in the ‘Contact Group’ to solve the crisis in Syria.

President Chavez said in a press conference, “We will study the Iranian proposal and see how we can contribute to reaching a solution to the crisis in Syria.”

Iran proposed that Venezuela, a member of the Non-Aligned Movement, and Iraq, as current president of the Arab League, join the coming meetings of the contact group on Syria which encompasses Egypt, Turkey and Saudi Arabia, in addition to Iran.

Following the Cairo meeting, Iranian Assistant Foreign Minister for Arab and African Affairs Hossein Amir Abdullahian stressed that his country welcomes the goal of the meeting as it is based on immediate halt of violence, maintaining Syria’s integrity and sovereignty and rejection of any foreign interference.

Source: Press TV

 

 

 

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Syria supports UNSC resolution on deployment of monitors

A UN Security Council session in New York (file photo)

Syria has voiced support for the UN Security Council resolution on the deployment of observers to monitor the ceasefire brokered by the UN-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan.

Syria’s UN envoy said on Saturday that Damascus is committed to implementing a six-point peace plan proposed by Annan, in an effort to bring an end to one-year unrest in the country.

Bashar Jaafari also called on regional countries to stop providing safe havens for armed groups.

He said such moves spread terrorism in Syria and countries that support armed gangs are responsible for the bloodshed.

Meanwhile, members of the United Nation Security Council approved a resolution that calls on the Syrian government to allow an advance team of up to 30 unarmed observers into Syria within days to monitor the ceasefire that took effect two days ago.

In violation of the ceasefire, armed groups in Syria launched rocket attacks on a neighborhood in the restive city of Homs today. The armed men also killed two government law enforcement officers who were on patrol.

Syria has been experiencing unrest since mid-March and many people, including security forces, have lost their lives in the violence.

The West and the Syrian opposition accuse the government of killing the protesters. But Damascus blames “outlaws, saboteurs and armed terrorist groups” for the unrest, insisting that it is being orchestrated from abroad.

Source: PressTV

Arab League As An Anti-Arab Weapon

By Elena Pustovoitova

Source: Strategic culture foundation

Elementary arithmetic routinely holds keys to much more complex political algebra. At the moment, for example, it appears that fairly simple regards explain the bizarre conduct of the Arab League which, contrary to reasonable expectations, aligned itself with the West in destabilizing Syria and keeping Bashar Assad under pressure.

It became clear immediately when protests erupted in Syria in March, 2011 that Washington would welcome serious arguments in favor of Assad’s ouster. The unrest in the country came as a predictable – and by no means the last – phase in the sequence of revolts inspired by the US and other countries in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Bahrain with the aim of tailoring the maps of North Africa and the Middle East to the liking of global heavyweights. Later on, the slogan of regime change in the name of “democracy” similarly popped up in Algeria, Jordan, Morocco, and Oman.

It did not evade watchers that mass protests in Syria began in the southern city of Daraa and mostly took place on Fridays, at the Muslims’ post-prayer time. Due to the clearcut tendency, Syria’s brewing revolt was even dubbed “the Friday Revolution”. The unrest quickly spilled from Daraa to other Syrian cities, with the protesters’ agenda – the abolition of the state of emergency law and the uprooting of the decades-old regime – borrowed with minimal adjustments from the Tahrir Square. Unlike Mubarak in Egypt, Syria’s Assad lifted the state of emergency right away, but the protesters evidently had much more far-reaching goals in mind. Continue reading

Syria rejects new Arab League resolutions

Damascus has rejected the Arab League’s call to bring international peacekeepers into Syria, labeling it a hostile act aimed at undermining security and stability in the country.

An emergency session of foreign ministers of the 22-member Arab League in Cairo has issued a resolution appealing to the UN to bring peacekeeping force into Syria. The international contingent, they insist, should be consisted of UN blue helmets and troops from Arab countries, “to oversee the implementation of a ceasefire.”

The plan comes as the UN General Assembly prepares to debate Syria.

The Arab League Secretary General Nabil El-Arabi proposed to form a new monitoring group for Syria, consisted of international observers of both the UN and the Arab League specialists. He also proposed former foreign minister of Jordan Abdelilah Al-Khatib to be a UN special envoy for Syria, a diplomat that previously worked as a UN special envoy for Libya.

Syria’s ambassador to Cairo Yusef Ahmed, who did not attend the meeting, said “The Syrian Arab Republic categorically rejects the decisions of the Arab League,” reports Xinhua. Continue reading

Pentagon plans US-backed war against Syria

By Chris Marsden ( Source: World Socialist )
10 February 2012

The Pentagon has drawn up plans for military intervention in Syria.

A military strike would be coordinated with Turkey, the Gulf States and the NATO powers, according to reports that acknowledge such plans officially for the first time. The plan is described as an “internal review” by Pentagon Central Command, to allow President Barack Obama to maintain the pretense that the White House is still seeking a diplomatic solution.

This is considered vital, as military intervention would most likely be conducted through various Middle East proxies, which the US and NATO could then back with airpower. Turkey and the Arab League states, led by Saudi Arabia and Qatar, do not want to be seen for what they are: stooges of the US. Deniability for them therefore requires the US to conceal the full extent of its involvement.

In the February 6 Financial Times, Anne-Marie Slaughter, a former director of policy planning for the US State Department, argued for “A little time… for continued diplomatic efforts aimed at shifting the allegiances of the Sunni merchant class in Damascus and Aleppo.”

As with the war against Libya last year, military intervention would again be justified citing the “responsibility to protect” civilians. But its real aim is regime change to install a Sunni government beholden to Washington, allied with the Gulf States, and hostile to Iran.

A State Department official told the UK’s Daily Telegraph that “the international community may be forced to ‘militarise’ the crisis in Syria” and that “the debate in Washington has shifted away from diplomacy.”

Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, said, “We are, of course, looking at humanitarian assistance to the Syrian people, and we have for some time.”

The Telegraph noted, “Any plan to supply aid or set up a buffer zone would involve a military dimension to protect aid convoys or vulnerable civilians.”

Leading US political figures have also been calling publicly for the arming of the Free Syrian Army, an exclusively Sunni force stationed in Turkey and backed and funded by Ankara, Riyadh and Doha. They include Joe Lieberman, John McCain and Lindsey Graham.

The issue was discussed this week in Washington directly with the FSA, whose logistical coordinator, Sheikh Zuheir Abassi, took part in a video conference call Wednesday with a US national security think tank.

The US, France, Britain and Arab League are already operating outside the framework of the United Nations as a “Friends of Syria” coalition, in order to bypass the opposition of Russia and China to a Libya-style intervention.

Qatar and Saudi Arabia are known to be arming the FSA and to have their own brigades and advisers on the ground, as they did in Libya.

According to the Israeli intelligence website Debka-File, both British and Qatari special operations units are already “operating with rebel forces under cover in the Syrian city of Homs just 162 kilometers from Damascus… Our sources report the two foreign contingents have set up four centers of operation—in the northern Homs district of Khaldiya, Bab Amro in the east, and Bab Derib and Rastan in the north. Each district is home to about a quarter of a million people.”

But the Gulf States do not have the firepower required to overthrow the Assad regime. For that Turkey is the key player. Debka-File notes in the report that the presence of the British and Qatari troops “was seized on by Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan for the new plan he unveiled to parliament in Ankara Tuesday, Feb. 7. Treating the British-Qatari contingents as the first foreign foot wedged through the Syrian door, his plan hinges on consigning a new Turkish-Arab force to Homs through that door and under the protection of those contingents. Later, they would go to additional flashpoint cities.”

Turkey is publicly debating military intervention based on establishing “safe havens” and “humanitarian aid corridors,” with Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu visiting Washington this week after stating that Turkey’s doors are open to Syrian refugees.

Writing in the February 9 New Republic, Soner Cagaptay argues, “Washington’s reluctance to lead an operation may prove a blessing, leaving space for Turkey to take the reins… Turkey would support an air-based intervention to protect UN designated safe havens—as long as the mission is led by a ‘regional force,’ composed of both Turkish and Arab militaries. Qatar and Saudi Arabia, who are funding the opposition, should be happy to work with their new ally in Ankara to protect the safe havens; Washington and European powers could then remotely back the operation, facilitating its success.”

The aim of isolating Iran has become the stated aim of US and Israeli officials, backed by a media campaign prominently involving the liberal press, mixing anti-Iranian sentiment with humanitarian hyperbole professing concern with the fate of Syria’s people.

Efraim Halevy, a former Israeli national security adviser and director of the security service Mossad from 1998 to 2002, wrote in the February 7 New York Times describing Syria as “Iran’s Achilles’ Heel.”

He writes, “Iran’s foothold in Syria enables the mullahs in Tehran to pursue their reckless and violent regional policies—and its presence there must be ended … Once this is achieved, the entire balance of forces in the region would undergo a sea change.”

The New York Times’ British counterpart, The Guardian, entrusts Simon Tisdall with the task of endorsing such anti-Iranian sentiment. He cites favourably Hillary Clinton’s ridiculing of Assad’s claims of foreign intervention in support of the opposition as being “Sadly… fully justified.” Rather, he insists, “The foreign power most actively involved inside Syria is not the US or Britain, France or Turkey. Neither is it Russia, Saudi Arabia nor its Gulf allies. It is Iran—and it is fighting fiercely to maintain the status quo.”

The appalling consequences of an American war against Syria would dwarf those of its Libyan adventure. Syria is only the ante-chamber of a campaign for regime change in Iran and its targeting poses ever more clearly conflict with Russia and possibly China.

Moscow last month sent three warships, including an aircraft carrier, to its only Mediterranean naval base, the Syrian port of Tartus. This followed its blocking of the US, France and UK-backed Arab-League resolution, meant to pave the way for intervention, with the dispatch of Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov to Damascus for talks with Assad, Tuesday, in a further show of solidarity. Lavrov was accompanied by Mikhail Fradkov, the head of Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Office.

Of greater significance still were comments made the following day by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, linking efforts to overthrow Assad with a direct Western threat to the stability of Russia through its support for opposition protests there. “A cult of violence has been coming to the fore in international affairs in the past decade,” he said. “This cannot fail to cause concern… and we must not allow anything like this in our country.”

Egyt: Amr Moussa ousted by the people

According to Akhbar Libya, Amr Moussa, expelled by the Egyptians after the funeral prayer for victims of the stadium incident of yesterday.

He wanted to attend the funeral to show his “love” to Egyptians when its only purpose is the presidential elections.
Amr Moussa, the man who delivered Libya to NATO! The death of the Libyan leader, his sons and his people will haunt you forever.

Source: Algeria ISP

Arab League Arrogance: Working Towards a Pretext to Wage a “Humanitarian War” on Syria

By Stephen Lendman

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On December 26, Arab League observers began monitoring Syrian cities. They’ll remain another month, despite calls to remove them.

Al Arabiya, Saudi Arabia’s state-controlled media, reported Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal saying:

“My country will withdraw its monitors because the Syrian government did not execute any of the elements of the Arab resolution plan.”

“We are calling on the international community to bear its responsibility, and that includes our brothers in Islamic states and our friends in Russia, China, Europe and the United States.”

He also called for “all possible pressure” against Assad.

Saudi Arabia kowtows to Washington. It’s also repressive and lawless with no legitimacy whatever. In its latest 2011 human rights assessment, America’s State Department accused it of arbitrary arrests and detention, torture and other abuses, political prisoners, absence of basic freedoms, and other international law violations.

It was said because it’s not reported. It also doesn’t deter America from supporting Saudi policies and pursuing far worse ones globally.

Pressure’s relentlessly building on Assad. Washington, Israel, and rogue allies plan regime change. Short of direct intervention, Western-generated uprisings began in March. Libya’s model was replicated.

Syria’s been ravaged for months. Thousands died, including security forces killed with heavy weapons.

Assad’s wrongfully blamed for a Western/Israeli/rogue regional alliance-generated insurgency. So far, he’s holding on. At issue is regime change, isolating Iran from its key ally.

Expect greater pressure on Tehran ahead. War’s an option, including against Syria, if sanctions and other destabilization methods fail.

On January 22, New York Times writer Kareem Fahim headlined, “Arab League Floats Ambitious New Peace Plan for Syria,” saying:

“Faced with the failure of its observer mission to curb violence,” League members “on Sunday unexpectedly floated an ambitious peace proposal that would require (Assad) to hand over power to a deputy and start negotiations with his opponents within two weeks.”

They also proposed a national unity government within two months, followed by presidential and parliamentary elections within six months.

In Cairo, Qatar’s Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, said:

“The formation of a national unity government within two months, with the participation of both the regime and the opposition, headed by an individual, previously agreed upon, and whose mission would be the implementation of the terms of the Arab League’s plan.”

Qatar’s Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim al-Thani said:

“We ask that the Syrian regime leave and hand over power. We are with the Syrian people, with their will and with their aspirations.”

Qatar’s an absolute monarchy. People have no say whatever. Its prime minister, Hamad bin Jasim bin Jabir Al Thani (a royal family member), said:

“We’re going to the Security Council. We know what the Syrian people are going through. We are doing as much as we can.”

Continue reading