‘US, UK hypocrisy shows in Bahrain’

Terror’s State continues in Bahrain while Western World is asleep.

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Bahraini Regime Attacks Ashoura Rituals

 

The Bahraini al-Wefaq opposition accused the regime of tightening against citizens’ religious freedoms and practice of religious rituals, as it has conducted a series of attacks on displays of Ashoura in some areas around the country.

It further clarified that the forces’ attacks on religious freedoms reveal the mentality of the forces, and that such acts can only be perpetrated under high-ranked orders.”The regime forces attack and provoke citizens rather than protect them,” al-Wefaq said.

Regarding threats by officials against religious freedoms, al-Wefaq stressed that suppression of religious freedoms to practice religious rituals is a dangerous attack that the regime solely bears responsibility of.

“Ashoura is held in most countries around the world, even non-Islamic countries. The event yearly takes place in Europe, America, Africa, Australia and the Asian countries, yet, has not been attacked anywhere around the globe except Bahrain, where the regime disrespects and targets religious freedoms,” it said.

Meanwhile, the party affirmed that religious freedoms in Bahrain are not subject to political use or bargaining, as the different sects of the Bahraini people have long respected these rituals and lived in harmony. “The only one who appears not able to live with this is the regime that continuously attacks these rituals,” it added.

Source: Al-Wefaq, Edited by Moqawama

Salafist Group Begs Funds for ‘Syrian Revolution’ via Bahraini Martyr Photo

Al-Dawa Egyptian salafist group has published a picture of the Bahraini martyr Ahmad Farhan on one of its posters to urge donors to support what it called the “Syrian revolution”.

The group has chosen the picture of martyr Farhan while he was carried by one of the demonstrators to be at the top ads of its media campaign, titled “the one Ummah campaign for the relief of our brothers in Syria.”

Farhan was killed in the island of Sitra, south of the capital Manama, a day after Peninsula Shield Forces entered the country in March 2011.

The slogans of “Syria never bows down,” and “we accept alms for the poor of Syria,” have been also written on the poster.

Martyr Ahmad Farhan, 30, was killed by the Peninsula Shield forces in March by a live bullet which blew his head. Al-Khalifa security forces also arrested the citizen who then brought him to the hospital.

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USS Persian Gulf

With Israel threatening to bomb Iran before the US presidential elections, and their silent partners Qatar and Saudi Arabia financing CIA arms flow to Syrian “rebels”; tensions in the Persian Gulf region are again on the rise. Since the overthrow of the US-puppet Shah in 1979, the international banksters have armed Iran’s Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) neighbors to the teeth.

(Excerpted from Big Oil & Their Bankers…Chapter 5: Persian Gulf Rent-a-Sheik)

By Dean Henderson, Left Hook

Following the Iranian Revolution the US more overtly displayed its willingness to lean on the Saudi monarchy.  During the 1979 border war between North and South Yemen US Secretary of Defense and Trilateralist Harold Brown pressured the Saudis to supply $390 million worth of US weapons to North Yemen where US advisers were running the show.  The conflict underscored the vulnerability of the oilfields of the Kingdom to the kind of nationalist rhetoric coming from the neighboring South Yemen government.

Brown also directed the Saudis finance the sale of twelve F-SE fighters by the US to Sudan.  With the Shah deposed, Brown busied himself selling surplus Iranian-bound weapons to the Saudis, as well as to Israel, Jordan, Oman and Egypt.  In the spring of 1980 the US signed a military pact with Turkey and sent the Turks $1 billion in weaponry. [206]

The Saudis immediately announced an oil production increase when the mullahs took Tehran.  Within two weeks of that announcement the US State Department unveiled a $1.2 billion program to shore up the Saudi National Guard.  The program would be supervised by Vinnell Corporation, a subsidiary of TRW, the San Francisco-based consumer credit reporting giant and leading supplier of NSA spy satellites.  By 1979 Saudi purchases of US weaponry surpassed even those of the Israelis.

Bendix, Raytheon, Grumman, Northrup, Lockheed, TWA and the US Army Corps of Engineers all flocked to Riyadh to exhibit their wares.  The US implemented American Peace Shield, through which tens of billions of dollars in defense contracts would be doled out.  Richard Secord swung an $8.5 billion contract for Boeing to provide AWACs to the Saudis.  An integrated Command and Control Center (C3) was established in Saudi Arabia. [207]

The US, Britain and France pushed for defense offset deals with the Kingdom, under which weapons were paid for in oil.  In 1990 the Saudis bought French Crotale missiles, with the French receiving discounted oil and promised to invest in Saudi industry.  A British program known as Al-Yamamah was spearheaded by British Aerospace (BAE) and run by a consortium of pan-European interests, whose governments established the Anglo-Saudi Committee.

Under Al-Yamamah the Euro governments, along with BP Amoco and Royal Dutch/Shell, receive free oil.  European arms dealers get contracts with the House of Saud and the Saudis receive help from the British in moving their oil operations downstream by investing in old Eastern European oil refineries. [208]

In 1989 BAE contracted to build Prince Sultan Air Base, while also selling Tornado fighters to the Saudis.  BAE bought Ballast Nedam, a Dutch heavy construction firm with Saudi ties, which built the massive bridge that now links the Saudi mainland to Bahrain. BAE netted $60 billion in the largest contract ever received from the Saudis by a Western company.

According to a June 27, 2007 Financial Times article, Al-Yamamah and BAE were being investigated by the US Justice Department.

The militarization of the Gulf Region went beyond the borders of Saudi Arabia.  In 1980 US arms sales and military aid to the GCC emirates were unprecedented.  The AWAC-monitored C3 defense system, now in place in Saudi Arabia, would be integrated with Hawk missile systems installed in all six GCC nations.

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Meet Amber Lyon: Former Reporter Exposes Massive Censorship at CNN

I saw first-hand that these regime claims were lies, and I couldn’t believe CNN was making me put what I knew to be government lies into my reporting.
Amber Lyon

The Amber Lyon story is just the latest in a series of articles that expose the total Joseph Goebbels like censorship rampant in mainstream media today.  The first one I posted several weeks ago exposed how the NY Times basically just regurgitates whatever government officials tell them, while the other showcased how an NPR reporter covering D.C. had to leave and do her own thing out of frustration.  This is precisely why alternative media sites are taking off.  They provide the only outlets left for genuine journalism.

So back to Amber.  Back in March 2011, CNN sent a four person team to Bahrain to cover the Arab Spring.  Once there, the crew was the subject of extreme intimidation amongst other things, but they were able to record some fantastic footage.  As Glenn Greenwald of the UK’s Guardian writes in his blockbuster article from today:

In the segment, Lyon interviewed activists as they explicitly described their torture at the hands of government forces, while family members recounted their relatives’ abrupt disappearances. She spoke with government officials justifying the imprisonment of activists. And the segment featured harrowing video footage of regime forces shooting unarmed demonstrators, along with the mass arrests of peaceful protesters. In sum, the early 2011 CNN segment on Bahrain presented one of the starkest reports to date of the brutal repression embraced by the US-backed regime.

Despite these accolades, and despite the dangers their own journalists and their sources endured to produce it, CNN International (CNNi) never broadcast the documentary. Even in the face of numerous inquiries and complaints from their own employees inside CNN, it continued to refuse to broadcast the program or even provide any explanation for the decision. To date, this documentary has never aired on CNNi.

Having just returned from Bahrain, Lyon says she “saw first-hand that these regime claims were lies, and I couldn’t believe CNN was making me put what I knew to be government lies into my reporting.”

After Lyon’s crew returned from Bahrain, CNN had no correspondents regularly reporting on the escalating violence. In emails to her producers and executives, Lyon repeatedly asked to return to Bahrain. Her requests were denied, and she was never sent back. She thus resorted to improvising coverage by interviewing activists via Skype in an attempt, she said, “to keep Bahrain in the news”.

In March 2012, Lyon was laid off from CNN as part of an unrelated move by the network to outsource its investigative documentaries.

“At this point,” Lyon said, “I look at those payments as dirty money to stay silent. I got into journalism to expose, not help conceal, wrongdoing, and I’m not willing to keep quiet about this any longer, even if it means I’ll lose those payments.”

Amber Lyons, I salute you.

Please forward this post to everyone you know.  I for one want to live in a country with some real and free press.  Not some CIA propaganda arm that pretends to be a reliable source of news.

Read Greenwald’s excellent article here.

In Liberty,
Mike

Source: Liberty blitzkrieg

Bahrain: Euro-Billionaires Party at Grand Prix as Citizens are Beaten and Shot Outside

By Patrick Henningsen, Infowars.com

In the gulf states, money and power trump human life.

With over 50 civilians dead and hundreds more imprisoned, the western-backed, ruling dictatorial monarchy in Bahrain sent a clear message to world as to where its loyalties truly are. Despite all of its horrific state-sponsored violence, the client state of Washington DC and Whitehall, still enjoys ’most favored nation status’.

While the European billionaire jet-set wined and dined their way through another Formula One calendar fixture, protesters were outside clashing with Bahrain police during the funeral of a political activist found dead over the weekend. Unlike the violence in Syria where rebels are being armed and backed by the US State Department and the British Foreign Office, the Bahrain uprising appears to be genuine and the protesters are all unarmed.

This past weekend should serve as an example to hawkish regime change voices in the west – particularly those voices in the US and Europe who clamor on about alleged ‘human rights’ abuses in Syria, as to the sheer hypocrisy that exists when it comes to evaluating which nations are left alone – and which governments must be “taken down”.

How can these gulf states operate within a such thin band of civilization and still receive the full backing of America and Great Britain? Here are a few answers:

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Grand Prix In Bahrain A Disgrace

By Stephen Lendman

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On Sunday, April 22, Bahrain’s Grand Prix went on as scheduled. This year’s grand prize is disgrace, not glory.

Formula 1’s governing board shamed itself by not pulling out. So did participating drivers. Agreeing to race in a virtual war zone shows nothing matters but winning and money – lots of it. Going along turns a blind eye to state terror.

Mass street protests for justice don’t matter. Nor do brutal security force crackdowns. London Guardian writer Richard Williams said F1’s “supremo Bernie Ecclestone” has a “habit of taking the money and asking no questions.”

Already a billionaire, his money lust is insatiable. Even with race day blood on the streets he wants more. So do participating drivers. Many are multi-millionaires. Passing up one stop on the circuit hardly matters. Sacrifice isn’t their long suit. Neither is doing the right thing.

They turn race competition into a perversion of sport. Thanks to Ecclestone, said Williams, “a sport whose conscience was only troubled by its environmental impact now looks like a pariah.”

Welcome to Bahrain. Witness two spectacles for the price of one – Grand Prix racing and security force viciousness on street protesters in one of the world’s most repressive dictatorships.

One protester death was reported. Salah Abbas Habib’s body was found on a Al Shakhoura rooftop. A well-known activist leader, he was arrested the previous night with others. Reportedly they were tortured. His body showed evidence of shotgun injuries and abuse.

Police tried to prevent journalists and others from seeing it. Photos revealed what they tried to suppress.

Mohammed Hassan was arrested. He tried escorting journalists to protest areas. Security forces beat him badly. Now detained, he’s held incommunicado with no access to counsel or family members.

On a March 30 TV interview, he was asked why he risked speaking publicly. He replied:

“I don’t care anymore. My friends have been in prison. Some are still (there), and some are in hiding, and some are dead.” Whatever happens to him, he added, he accepts it. “I have no choice but to accept it.”

After the interview, he was threatened. He was arrested and beaten. He also participated in a public debate. Expressing his views freely made him a marked man. Now he’s dead. Responsibility points one way.

For weeks, security force violence caused many injuries. More occur daily. On April 10, Bahrain’s interior minister authorized excessive force. Dozens of casualties followed. Many were from shotgun cartridge fragments directed on faces, chests, backs, abdomens, thighs, and other upper body areas.

For weeks ahead of race day, security forces raided towns and villages. Dozens of arrests followed. So did torture and other forms of abuse.

Imagine turning a blind eye and agreeing to be part of this. Writer/activist Finian Cunningham quoted a racing fan saying “(a) bunch of rich people hav(e) fun while others are being killed.”

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FROM THE “ARAB SPRING” TO THE “ISLAMIC AWAKENING”: CONTINUITY OF US HEGEMONY

By Prof. Colin S. Cavell

As the tumult and tribulations of this world continue to beat up and pound down working people with little solace from existing human agencies—either governmental, corporate, or individual, average folks will invariably turn towards alternative means of liberation either from strategies firmly planted in this world or from other worldly promises of relief from their distress, for as human beings we are hard-wired to seek freedom, and when this fundamental desire is suppressed and consolation from our worldly pains are denied, we die emotionally and become at best automatons easily manipulated and controlled by others.  As the U.S. Declaration of Independence states:  “Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.  But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security” (July 4, 1776).

 

In the case of the United States foreign policy towards Bahrain and the Gulf Kingdoms, Jeffersonian democratic values enshrined in the nation’s Constitution consisting of majority rule; republican (i.e. representative) forms of governance; separation of powers between legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government; federalism (division of power between national and local rule); and checks and balances (to prevent any one branch from becoming supreme) have seemingly disappeared from the country’s foreign policy agenda, and this does not even begin to catalog the apparent abandonment of concern for fundamental human rights such as freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom of assembly, and freedom to redress grievances—all of which are being ignored on a daily basis in Bahrain today with tacit U.S. government support. 

Vocal utterance of and bland support for such democratic values are made from time to time when the U.S. is castigating regimes it considers hostile, but in the case of allied or client regimes in the region—unless they are on the verge of internal collapse as in the recent case of Mubarak’s Egypt—such democratic ethical principles are almost completely dismissed.  And just as individuals are judged by the company they keep, so too are governments evaluated and assessed by their political dispositions, orientations, and allies. 

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