Syria: Public Execution Victims Identified as Civilians

Two weeks ago, Syria Report posted an article detailing the public execution of three men in Ar-Raqqah city. On March 4, 2013 the city fell in the hands of three Jihadist organisations; the infamous Jabhat al-Nusra, Harakat Ahrar as-Sham and the brigade of Huthaya bin al-Yaman.

In the following video, three men can be seen kneeling, bound and blindfolded as armed and masked men guard them. Noticeable is the black standard of the Islamic State of Iraq. A speech is then read out to the gathered crowd, stating the executions are in retaliation for the massacres of Sunnis and singles out Alawites in particular. Sectarian rhetoric such as this appears to be growing in regularity in recent weeks.

Warning: Video is Graphic

Source: Syria Report

 

Orthodox Priest Kidnapped and Executed by US-NATO Sponsored Rebels

Damascus (Agenzia Fides) – The body of the greek orthodox priest Fr. Fadi Jamil Haddad, pastor of the church of St. Elias in Qatana, was found today in the Jaramana neighborhood (north of Damascus) not far from the place where he was kidnapped, on October 19, by unidentified armed group (see Fides 24/10/2012). This was confirmed to Fides by Fr. Haddad’s greek-orthodox confrere, who asked for anonymity. “His body was horribly tortured and his eyes gouged out,” he told Fides. “It is a purely terrorist act. Fr. Haddad is a martyr of our church. ”

With regards to the responsibilities of the terrible act there is an ongoing rebound of responsibilities between the opposition forces and government authorities, that accuse the armed gangs of armed rebellion in the army. According to Fides sources, the kidnappers had asked the priest’s family and his church a ransom of 50 million Syrian pounds (over 550 thousand euro). It was, however, impossible to find the money and meet this exorbitant demand. A source of Fides condemns “the terrible practice, present for months in this dirty war, of kidnapping and then killing innocent civilians.”

Among the various Christian communities in Syria, the greek orthodox is the largest (with about 500 thousand faithful) and is concentrated mainly in the western part of the country and in Damascus.