Female Syrian refugees in Turkey being sold to Arab states: Turkish politician

Syrian refugee women and children walk along the fence of their camp on the Syrian border near the east Turkish village of Apaydin, December 12, 2012.

The deputy chairman of the Turkish opposition Republican People’s Party, Faruq Logoglu, says female Syrian refugees in Turkish camps are being sold to rich sheikhs in Arab countries.

Addressing the parliament on Tuesday, the Turkish official criticized the violation of human rights in the refugee camps in Turkey, saying women and girls are being sent to neighboring rich Arab states in exchange for money, Turkish Taraf daily reported on Tuesday.

He said refugee children from Syria are also being trianed to use guns and are sent to Syria to fight against Syrian government forces.

Turkey is home to 180,000 of the Syrian refugees in camps in the south of the country.

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), 75 percent of the Syrian refugees who have taken shelter in Turkey are women and children.

The Turkish Republican People’s Party has repeatedly pronounced its opposition to Turkey’s stance on Syria, calling for an end to the Syrian conflict and a diplomatic solution to the ongoing crisis in the country.

Since the start of the unrest in Syria, Turkey has thrown its weight behind the militants fighting the Syrian government. Continue reading

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Siege of Bani Walid: Foreign fighters, phosphorus bombs and nerve gas (Graphic images)

The besieged Libyan city of Bani Walid has been plunged into chaos. Several sources told RT the former Gaddafi regime stronghold is under attack by militias bolstered by foreign mercenaries, and they used banned weapons like white phosphorous.

The sources denied reports of the last few days that Bani Walid was retaken by the Libyan government. Residents said that militia forces have continued their assault, while preventing the refugees who fled from reentering the city.

A man who claimed his relatives are trapped inside the besieged city spoke with RT, saying, “There is no food; there is nothing to support the life of people. And the militia does not allow anyone to come back to their homes.”

“They are demolishing homes with machinery and tanks. There is no communication or internet so people are not able to connect with each other,” the source said. He is currently in Egypt, and refuses to reveal his identity over fears of personal safety.

He believes the real reason for the inoperable communications is that many people have been killed inside Bani Walid by the forces besieging the city and now they are trying to prevent information about the killings to be leaked outside.

The militia attackers have claimed they are battling ‘pro-Gaddafi’ forces, but the source slammed that motive as a “lie and a dirty game.”

“They use foreign snipers, I think from Qatar or Turkey, with Qatar covering all the costs,” he said. He claimed that a ship with weapons and other equipment recently docked in the port city of Misrata, where the assault on Bani Walid is allegedly being directed.

“There is no government in Libya. Groups of militia control everything. They don’t care about Libya, they don’t care about the nation,” he said, adding allegations that the majority of militia fighters have dual citizenship or passports from other countries.

“We ask the envoy [Special Representative] of the Secretary-General of the United Nations [for Libya] Mr. Tarik Mitri – where is he now?” he said. “Where is the United Nations? Where is the EU? Where is the Human Rights Watch? We ask for an intervention now as soon as possible – please!”

In an October 23 UN session, the US blocked a statement on the violence in Bani Walid drafted by Russia, which condemned the ongoing conflict in the city and calling for a peaceful resolution.

RT Photo from Bani Walid. RT source. The photo could not be independently verified.

Witnesses claim militia used chemical weapons in Bani Walid

“I can confirm that pro-government militias used internationally prohibited weapons. They used phosphorus bombs and nerve gas. We have documented all this in videos, we recorded the missiles they used and the white phosphorus raining down from these missiles,” Bani Walid-based activist and lawyer Afaf Yusef told RT. Continue reading

Ahmadinejad: “World must condemn killing of Press TV reporter, Maya Nasser, in Syria”

Press TV correspondent in Damascus, Maya Naser, who was killed in a terrorist attack on September 26, 2012

 

Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has called on the international community to condemn the assassination of a Press TV correspondent in Syria.

“I do hope that such an event will not be repeated anywhere in the world and I do hope that all, without paying attention to the personal preferences, will come to condemn such events,” President Ahmadinejad said in a press conference following his speech at the 67th session of the UN General Assembly in New York on Wednesday.

Insurgents in the Syrian capital of Damascus attacked Press TV staff, killing the Iranian English-language news network’s correspondent, Maya Naser, and injuring Press TV and Al-Alam Damascus Bureau Chief Hosein Mortada, on Wednesday.

Naser was shot and killed by a sniper, while Mortada, a Lebanese national, was shot and wounded in the back.

The two were covering twin bomb blasts, which targeted the military command building in the Syrian capital and killed at least four Syrian security forces.

The Iranian president expressed his sincere condolences over the death of the Press TV correspondent and called on everyone to respect the sanctity of reporters.

He said that reporting is a very important tool which sheds light on realities and informs the international community about events that happen in faraway places.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast on Wednesday strongly condemned the latest terrorist attacks in Syria, which led to Naser’s death.

“The mass media are working in the most difficult circumstances to reflect the realities and truth to the public opinion, and recourse to violence and terrorism can never prevent Syria’s realities from being revealed to people,” he said.

Born on July 30, 1979 in Syria, Maya Naser had studied political science, was fluent in Arabic and English and had worked in many countries including the US, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt and Bahrain.

Syria has been the scene of deadly unrest since mid-March, 2011 and many people, including large numbers of army and security personnel, have been killed in the violence.

The Syrian government says that the chaos is being orchestrated from outside the country, and there are reports that a large number of the insurgents are foreign nationals.  Continue reading

Saudi Arabia Continues Suppressing Popular Protests

TEHRAN (Source: FNA)- Saudi security forces opened fire on demonstrators as a large number of people staged a rally in the oil-rich Eastern Province of Qatif to call for the freedom of political inmates held in the country’s jails.

Thousands of demonstrators on Friday also demanded that the Al Saud regime set free prominent Shiite cleric Sheikh Nemr al-Nemr.

Sheikh Nemr was attacked, injured and arrested by Saudi security forces while driving from a farm to his house in Qatif on July 8.

Chanting slogans in support of social justice in the province, protestors asked the regime to stop killing civilians by the Saudi-backed forces in neighboring Bahrain, press tv reported.

Some of the demonstrators were also detained and some others were injured as a result of violent crackdown by the security forces, activists said.

Earlier in the week, similar demonstrations were held against the regime in the town of Awamiyah and the city of Buraydah.

Similar demonstrations have also been held in Riyadh and the holy city of Medina over the past few weeks.

 

 

 

US, Israeli terrorism will go down: Iran’s Armed Forces

Photo shows smoke billowing over Damascus, Syria, Wednesday, July 18, 2012.

The Central Command of Iran’s Armed Forces has condemned the latest terrorist attack that killed three senior officials in Syria, saying that the ‘US-Israeli state terrorism’ and pressures on the resistance front are doomed to fail.

“Despite the high pressure exerted by the global arrogance on Syria and the resistance movement, the evil forces will have no choice but to retreat,” said the Armed Forces Central Command in a Thursday statement.

The Syrian government and nation are determined to weather the US and its European and regional allies’ radicalism, and have so far succeeded in fulfilling the task, it added. Continue reading

Grand Prix In Bahrain A Disgrace

By Stephen Lendman

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On Sunday, April 22, Bahrain’s Grand Prix went on as scheduled. This year’s grand prize is disgrace, not glory.

Formula 1’s governing board shamed itself by not pulling out. So did participating drivers. Agreeing to race in a virtual war zone shows nothing matters but winning and money – lots of it. Going along turns a blind eye to state terror.

Mass street protests for justice don’t matter. Nor do brutal security force crackdowns. London Guardian writer Richard Williams said F1’s “supremo Bernie Ecclestone” has a “habit of taking the money and asking no questions.”

Already a billionaire, his money lust is insatiable. Even with race day blood on the streets he wants more. So do participating drivers. Many are multi-millionaires. Passing up one stop on the circuit hardly matters. Sacrifice isn’t their long suit. Neither is doing the right thing.

They turn race competition into a perversion of sport. Thanks to Ecclestone, said Williams, “a sport whose conscience was only troubled by its environmental impact now looks like a pariah.”

Welcome to Bahrain. Witness two spectacles for the price of one – Grand Prix racing and security force viciousness on street protesters in one of the world’s most repressive dictatorships.

One protester death was reported. Salah Abbas Habib’s body was found on a Al Shakhoura rooftop. A well-known activist leader, he was arrested the previous night with others. Reportedly they were tortured. His body showed evidence of shotgun injuries and abuse.

Police tried to prevent journalists and others from seeing it. Photos revealed what they tried to suppress.

Mohammed Hassan was arrested. He tried escorting journalists to protest areas. Security forces beat him badly. Now detained, he’s held incommunicado with no access to counsel or family members.

On a March 30 TV interview, he was asked why he risked speaking publicly. He replied:

“I don’t care anymore. My friends have been in prison. Some are still (there), and some are in hiding, and some are dead.” Whatever happens to him, he added, he accepts it. “I have no choice but to accept it.”

After the interview, he was threatened. He was arrested and beaten. He also participated in a public debate. Expressing his views freely made him a marked man. Now he’s dead. Responsibility points one way.

For weeks, security force violence caused many injuries. More occur daily. On April 10, Bahrain’s interior minister authorized excessive force. Dozens of casualties followed. Many were from shotgun cartridge fragments directed on faces, chests, backs, abdomens, thighs, and other upper body areas.

For weeks ahead of race day, security forces raided towns and villages. Dozens of arrests followed. So did torture and other forms of abuse.

Imagine turning a blind eye and agreeing to be part of this. Writer/activist Finian Cunningham quoted a racing fan saying “(a) bunch of rich people hav(e) fun while others are being killed.”

Continue reading

Turkish airstrikes kill 30 Kurds

File photo of a Turkish warplane
At least 30 people have been killed in Turkish airstrikes by F-16 warplanes on a Kurdish village in the southeast of Turkey near the Iraqi border, Press TV reports.

Mayor of Uludere district of Sirnak province Fehmi Yaman said that the bodies were found in Ortasu village in Sirnak after the attacks on Thursday morning.

Earlier in the day, Ertan Eris, an official within the pro-Kurdish Peace and Democracy Party (BDP) had put the death toll at 23.

Eris added that the dead people were among a group of 35 to 40, aged from 16 to 20, who had crossed the border for “smuggling purposes.”

The death toll might increase due to snow and rough terrain, which make the search for bodies difficult, Eris said.

Meanwhile, local security sources said the group was “smuggling gas and sugar into Turkey from northern Iraq” and may have been “mistaken” for Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) terrorists.

The Turkish military began an operation in northern Iraq in October after 24 Turkish troops were killed in an attack by the PKK in the town of Cukurca near the Iraqi border. The army killed 36 PKK members in Kazan Valley of Hakkari province.

On October 31, Deputy Chairperson of the BDP Meral Danis Bestas accused the Turkish army of using “chemical weapons” in the operation.

The PKK launched an armed campaign against Turkey in 1984 in a quest to gain independence for Kurds living in the southeast of the country.

Soruce: PressTV

Senate approves indefinite detention and torture of Americans

The terrifying legislation that allows for Americans to be arrested, detained indefinitely, tortured and interrogated — without charge or trial — passed through the Senate on Thursday with an overwhelming support from 93 percent of lawmakers.

Only seven members of the US Senate voted against the National Defense Authorization Act on Thursday, despite urging from the ACLU and concerned citizens across the country that the affects of the legislation would be detrimental to the civil rights and liberties of everyone in America. Under the bill, Americans can be held by the US military for terrorism-related charges and detained without trial indefinitely.

Additionally, another amendment within the text of the legislation reapproved waterboarding and other “advanced interrogation techniques” that are currently outlawed.

“The bill is an historic threat to American citizens,” Christopher Anders of the ACLU tells the Associated Press.

For the biggest supporters of the bill, however, history necessitates that Americans must sacrifice their security for freedom. Continue reading

UN Report Offers Smoking Gun Proof of NATO and US Lies about Libya

By Dennis South at nsnbc

Here is a type of “smoking gun” proof that NATO and the U.S. has been operating through a smokescreen of lies, as well as intimidation. Please read the following January 4, 2011 report of the 16th Session of the United Nations General Assembly Human Rights Council, Universal Periodic Review:

Report of the Working Group on the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya [Document A/HRC/WG.6/9/L.13]

Before NATO and the U.S. started bombing Libya, the United Nations was preparing to bestow an award on Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, and the Libyan Jamahiriya, for its achievements in the area of human rights. That’s right–the same man, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, that NATO and the United States have been telling us for months is a “brutal dictator,” was set to be given an award for his human rights record in Libya. How strange it is that the United Nations was set to bestow a human rights award on a “brutal dictator,” at the end of March.

So, I ask a question. Who is this “brutal dictator” that the United Nations General Assembly Human Rights Council was preparing to bestow an award to, for human rights, sometime at the end of March? So, they would have us believe that they knew that he was a “brutal dictator,” yet decided to give him an award for human rights?! Astounding! Astounding the lies that we’re being told by the media, NATO and the U.S. government. Absolutely astounding! Not surprising, but astounding! But more astounding still, is the fact that, time after time after time, much of the American public–without questioning–believes every single word that comes from the “news” media.

It is noteworthy to read the following couple of sentences from the General Assembly’s report:

“Several delegations also noted with appreciation the country’s commitment to upholding human rights on the ground. Additional statements, which could not be delivered during the interactive dialogue, owing to time constraints, will be posted on the extranet of the universal periodic review when available.”

Continue reading