Blast in Syrian national TV building injures several

Syrian troops walk in a neighborhood of Damascus. (File photo)

Several people have been injured in an explosion at the headquarters of the Syrian national television in the capital, Damascus.

The Syrian media said that an explosion rocked the third floor of the Syrian television headquarters on Monday.

Syrian Information Minister Omran al-Zoabi said the blast was caused by an explosive device, adding, “Several of our colleagues were injured, but there were no serious injuries, and no dead.”

The development comes as fighting continues between Syrian security forces and foreign-sponsored insurgents in the northwestern city of Aleppo.

Meanwhile, the Syrian state TV said the army has arrested a group of Turkish and Saudi officers in Aleppo.

On Sunday, the Syrian army began a major operation to clear the southwestern neighborhood of Salahuddin in Aleppo of the insurgents.  Continue reading

Syria: For the release of our compatriots and colleagues held captive in Baba Amr

(Editor’s note: Article is also available in French, Italian, German & Arabic HERE)

Several journalists are held in the sealed-off Baba Amr area. According to Atlanticist leaders, they are prevented from leaving by the constant pounding of the rebel stronghold by the Syrian Army. As an on-the-spot privileged witness of the negotiations, Thierry Meyssan gives an account of the situation: the journalists are kept as prisoners by the Free “Syrian” Army which uses them as human shields. Their evacuation by the Syrian Red Crescent has been obstructed by the rebels.

Édith Bouvier and William Daniels

Our colleagues Marie Colvin (Sunday Times) and Remi Ochlik (IP3 Press) were killed on Wednesday, 22 February 2012, in the rebel-held area inside Homs.

According to Western news agencies quoting the Free “Syrian” Army, they were victims of the shelling inflicted by the Damascus forces on the area. However, the National Army made use of multiple rocket launchers only for a very brief period to destroy firing positions, and at no time after 13 February. Furthermore, if it were true that the city was pounded for 21 days, as reported by the news agencies, it would have been reduced to a heap of rubble without a living soul a long time ago.

At least three other journalists still remain in the rebel zone: Edith Bouvier (Le Figaro Magazine), Paul Conroy and William Daniels (Sunday Times), and probably a fourth one of Spanish nationality. Continue reading