Classified Information on Malaysia Airlines MH370 Case Stolen

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The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 flight MH370 traveling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board, of which there were 227 passengers and 12 crew members.

RIA NOVOSTI

MOSCOW, August 20 (RIA Novosti) – Classified information from the computers of officials involved in the investigation into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines MH370 has been stolen, The Star Online reported Wednesday.

The computers of the high-ranking officials are said to have been hacked and the stolen information was allegedly being sent to a computer in China before the Malaysian Science, Technology and Innovation Ministry blocked the transmissions, the website reported.

[EDITOR’S NOTE: The people that hacked into these computers could well have it done as it appears to originate from China.]

The national cyber security specialist agency CyberSecurity Malaysia said that the malware that led to the information leak was sent to the officials via email on March 9, one day after the aircraft disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, according to The Star Online.

According to the security agency’s estimates, about 30 computers were infected by the malware. The agency is said to be working with Interpol on the incident at the moment. CyberSecurity Malaysia suspects that the motivation for the attack was the accusations of the Malaysian government made by some people of concealing crucial information about the investigation.

The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 flight MH370 traveling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board, of which there were 227 passengers and 12 crew members. On March 24, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said that, according to the satellite data [provided by British Firm Inmarsat, emphasised] , MH370 crashed in the southern part of the Indian Ocean.

U.S.A prepares to blame MH17 shoot down on Ukrainian army “defector”

In an attempt to explain away the existence of evidence which shows Ukrainian troops firing the missile that brought down Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Washington may be preparing to fix the intelligence by pinning the blame on a “defector” in order to absolve Kiev.

As we reported on Monday, award winning former AP and Newsweek reporter Robert Parry was told by an intelligence source that the U.S. is in possession of images which show men dressed in Ukrainian Army uniforms operating the Buk missile system which shot down MH17.

If proven accurate, such information would completely eviscerate Washington and Kiev’s already shaky narrative that Russian-backed separatist rebels were responsible for the attack.

The U.S. State Department now appears to be shifting the emphasis of its narrative to discount the possibility that Kiev itself was responsible for shooting down MH17. As the L.A. Times reported yesterday, “U.S. officials said it was possible the SA-11 [anti-aircraft missile] was launched by a defector from the Ukrainian military who was trained to use similar missile systems.”

Blaming the incident on a “defector” would allow the U.S. to explain why the culprit was wearing a Ukrainian Army uniform when he shot down the airliner.

“That statement about a possible “defector” might explain why some analysts thought they saw soldiers in Ukrainian army uniforms tending to the missile battery in eastern Ukraine. But there is another obvious explanation that the U.S. intelligence community seems unwilling to accept: that the missile may have been launched by someone working for the Ukrainian military,” writes Parry, adding that, “We may be seeing another case of the U.S. government “fixing the intelligence” around a desired policy outcome, as occurred in the run-up to war with Iraq.”

Over the last 48 hours, the State Department’s narrative has been widely discredited because of Washington’s inability to provide hard evidence based on anything other than dubious social media posts and YouTube videos uploaded by the Ukrainian government.

During a remarkable exchange yesterday between AP reporter Matt Lee and U.S. State Department Deputy Spokesperson Marie Harf, Lee backed Harf into a corner and forced her to tacitly acknowledge that the United States’ case is entirely built on little more than alleged social media posts.

The U.S. later admitted that it had uncovered no evidence whatsoever that linked Russia directly to the attack.

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Source: Infowars

MH370: BOEING TECHNOLOGY – WHAT GOES UP MUST COME DOWN

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By DR MAHATHIR MOHAMAD, former Prime Minister of Malaysia

1. What goes up must come down. Airplanes can go up and stay up for long periods of time. But even they must come down eventually. They can land safely or they may crash. But airplanes don’t just disappear. Certainly not these days with all the powerful communication systems, radio and satellite tracking and filmless cameras which operate almost indefinitely and possess huge storage capacities.

2. I wrote about the disabling of MH370’s communication system as well as the signals for GPS. The system must have been disabled or else the ground station could have called the plane. The GPS too must have been disabled or else the flight of MH370 would have been tracked by satellites which normally provide data on all commercial flights, inclusive of data on location, kind of aircraft, flight number, departure airport and destination. But the data seems unavailable. The plane just disappeared seemingly from all screens.

3. MH370 is a Boeing 777 aircraft. It was built and equipped by Boeing. All the communications and GPS equipment must have been installed by Boeing. If they failed or have been disabled Boeing must know how it can be done. Surely Boeing would ensure that they cannot be easily disabled as they are vital to the safety and operation of the plane.

4. A search on the Internet reveals that Boeing in 2006 received a US patent for a system that, once activated, removes all control from pilots to automatically return a commercial airliner to a pre-determined landing location.

5. The Flightglobal.com article by John Croft, datelined Washington DC (1st December, 2006) further mentioned “The ‘uninterruptible’ autopilot would be activated – either by pilot, by on board sensors, or even remotely by radio or satellite links by government agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency, if terrorists attempt to gain control of the flight deck”.

6. Clearly Boeing and certain agencies have the capacity to take over “uninterruptible control” of commercial airliners of which MH370 B777 is one.

7. Can it not be that the pilot of MH370 lost control of their aircraft after someone directly or remotely activated the equipment for seizure of control of the aircraft.

8. It is a waste of time and money to look for debris or oil slick or to listen for “pings” from the black box. This is most likely not an ordinary crash after fuel was exhausted. The plane is somewhere, maybe without MAS markings.

9. Boeing should explain about this so-called anti-terrorism auto-land system. I cannot imagine the pilots made a soft-landing in rough seas and then quietly drown with the aircraft.

10. Someone is hiding something. It is not fair that MAS and Malaysia should take the blame.

11. For some reason the media will not print anything that involves Boeing or the CIA. I hope my readers will read this.

MH370 search: Boeing has patent for autopilot tech Remote Control

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Leading Seaman Aircrewman Daniel Colbert operating the Sensor Operator console on HMAS Toowoomba’s S-70B-2 Seahawk helicopter, Tiger 75, during the search for missing Malaysia Airways Flight MH370.

By Sira Habibu, The Star Asia news network – 12 April 2014

PETALING JAYA – When it was first speculated that Flight MH370 could have been hijacked via remote control access, many dismissed it as far-fetched science fiction.

But the technology to navigate planes, ships, trains, buses and other vehicles by remote control has been around for about a decade.

The Boeing Company, the world’s leading aerospace company and the largest manufacturer of commercial jetliners and military aircraft, has the technology.

It owns a patent for a system that enables remote controlling of its aircraft to counter hijacking attempts.

Boeing applied for the patent for an “uninterruptible autopilot control system” about 11 years ago, and was awarded it in 2006.

The system can be activated when the security of onboard controls are jeopardised.

“The method and systems of the present invention provide techniques for automatically navigating, flying and landing an air vehicle,” states the report for the US patent number US7142971B2.

Once activated, an aircraft could be automatically navigated, flown and made to land without input from anyone on board.

“Any onboard capability to supercede the automatic control system may be disabled by disconnecting the onboard controls,” states the report.

Power is provided to the automatic control system “from an alternative power control element that is inaccessible (to anyone on board the vehicle)”.

According to the patent report, control commands could be received from a remote location and/or from predetermined control commands stored on board the plane.

Boeing applied for the patent on Feb 19, 2003, barely two years after the Sept 11 attack in which hijacked planes rammed into the World Trade Centre, reducing the gigantic buildings into rubble.

Eric D. Brown, Douglas C. Cameron, Krish R. Krothapalli, Walter von Klein Jr and Todd M. William invented the system for Boeing. The patent was awarded three years later on Nov 28, 2006.

When the automatic control system is activated, no one on board the aircraft would be capable of controlling its flight.

The patent report also states that a signal might be transmitted to at least one remote location from the plane to indicate that the uninterruptible autopilot mode of the air vehicle has been engaged.

The system includes a dedicated communication link between the aircraft and a remote location, distinct from any communication link established for other types of communication.

According to an independent analyst James Corbett, the US Federal Aviation Administration had reported on the Federal Registrar last November that the Boeing 777-200, -300 and -300ER aircraft were equipped with an electronics security system to check unauthorised internal access.