US-Created “Syrian Opposition” Led by Big Oil Rep

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By Tony Cartalucci, Land Destroyer for Activist Post

A year ago, it was reported that Libya’s new NATO-installed prime minister, Abdurrahim el-Keib, was in fact a long-time US resident, having taught at the University of Alabama and was formally employed by the Petroleum Institute, based in Abu Dhabi, UAE and sponsored by British Petroleum (BP), Shell, France’s Total, the Japan Oil Development Company, and the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company. El-Keib is listed as a “Professor and Chairman” in his Petroleum Institute profile which also describes extensive research conducted by him sponsored by various US government agencies and departments over the years.

His long history of serving and working in coordination with Western governments and corporations made him and his collaborators the ideal candidates to prepare Libya for its place within the Wall Street-London international order.

Now it is revealed that the US-handpicked opposition, announced in Doha, Qatar earlier this month, is led by a similarly compromised figure, Moaz al-Khatib. The corporate-financier-funded Carnegie Endowment for International Peace reported of al-Khatib that:

Moaz al-Khatib, an oil sector engineer and former imam of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, has garnered substantial praise since his designation, while Riad Seif and Suhair al-Atassi bring their own credibility to the coalition. They have now set up shop in Cairo and have received the full endorsement of France, Italy, the United Kingdom, Turkey, and the members of the Gulf Cooperation Council as the ‘sole representative’ of the Syrian opposition. The European Union and the United States have endorsed the group in a more general fashion.

Even more importantly, from Syrian citizens of various affiliations with whom I have met recently, it is clear that al-Khatib and his associates seem to draw praise for their opposition to the regime—as an imam, al-Khatib refused to follow the speeches imposed by the regime and was imprisoned—their resistance, and their tolerance. These endorsements are a first achievement, but a number of steps are necessary before Moaz al-Khatib becomes the real head of the Syrian opposition and enters into a substantive relationship with EU leaders.

However, this resounding praise should be kept in the context that among the Carnegie Endowment’s sponsors are in fact many “oil sector” giants including British Petroleum (BP), Chevron, Exxon, and Shell.

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A Portrait of False Activism and Deceptive Democracy: Aung San Suu Kyi Receives Fascist Seal of Approval

British FM William Hague awards her the “Chatham House Prize”

By Tony Cartalucci
Source: Land Destroyer

In the first visit to Myanmar by a British foreign minister in 56 years — since the British were expelled from the nation, then called Burma after its declaration of independence in 1956 — William Hague took it upon himself to present “democracy icon” Aung San Suu Kyi with the “Chatham House Prize.”

Hague hands Suu Kyi the “Chatham House Prize.” Nothing quite says “democracy promotion” like a prize from an organization consisting of Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, BP, Exxon, Chevron, BAE, Boeing, Lockheed, and many more. This is just the latest in a long line of self-aggrandizing stunts the global elite pull to lend themselves otherwise non-existent legitimacy.

The “Chatham House Prize” is given annually to a “statesperson who is deemed by Chatham House members to have made the most significant contribution to the improvement of international relations in the previous year.” The decision process is conducted by research teams and the Chatham House’s presidents who are currently John MajorPatricia Scotland, and none other than Paddy Ashdown, who just finished defiling the spirit of innovation and pragmatism at the TED Talks with his sales pitch for global governance run by the corporate-financier elite.

The prize is given to those “deemed by Chatham House members” to have made contributions to the improvement of “international relations.” The Chatham House membership is described as “individuals, companies and organizations who share a deep interest in international affairs, independent thinking and debate.” Their membership includes, “academics, diplomats, the media, NGOs, politicians, policy-makers, researchers and business people.” Continue reading