Iran’s Strategic Diplomatic Victory over the Washington-Israeli Axis: Its Larger Political Consequences

Both in terms of form and content the NAM meeting highlighted the superiority of Iran ’s diplomacy over and against Washington ’s bellicose posturing and improvised diversionary tactics.

By James Petras

Introduction

Iran chaired, hosted and led the recently rejuvenated Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) meeting in Teheran, attended by delegates from 120 countries, including 31 heads of state and 29 foreign secretaries of state.  Even the United Nations General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon, notorious mouthpiece of Washington , felt obligated to address, a forum attended by two-thirds of the member countries of the UN, despite State Department and Israeli objections. Any objective evaluation of the meeting, its venue, the attendance, resolutions and political impact leads to one paramount conclusion:  the NAM meeting was a strategic diplomatic victory for Iran and a major defeat for the US , Israel and the European Union.  The entire US-Israeli-EU diplomatic and propaganda effort to isolate and stigmatize Iran , especially over the past decade, was shredded.

The Politics of Attendance

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (R) welcomes Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (C) at the Presidential Palace in Tehran, Iran, 29 August 2012. Singh is in Tehran to attend the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) summit and also hold talks with Iranian leaders on bilateral trade and regional issues. Credit: EPA

Attendance by representatives of 120 countries demonstrates that Iran is not a ‘pariah state’; it is an accepted member of the international community.The presence of 60 heads of state and foreign secretaries demonstrates that Iran is considered a noteworthy and significant political actor, not a “terrorist state” to be isolated and shunned.  The proceedings, debates and discussions among and between the delegates and Iranian leaders convinced those attending that Teheran gives primacy to reasonable dialogue in resolving international conflicts. Continue reading